Human-Centered Design

 

Human centered design (HCD) emerged from the private sector and has been gaining traction in the social impact field for fostering new and lasting solutions. HCD prioritizes a participatory, bottom-up process where end users and other stakeholders play a lead role in shaping solutions to meet their needs. We apply HCD methods to stakeholders across the entire value chain – from agents to government officials – to support better decision-making and institutional change. Our expertise includes service and program design, product and business prototypes, innovation strategy and capacity building and design labs.

 

Dalberg to host State of Aadhaar Initiative 


We are excited to announce that Dalberg is hosting the State of Aadhaar initiative for 2019 and 2020. Sponsored by Omidyar Network, the initiative aims to build a shared understanding of India’s national digital ID system, Aadhaar. 

Michael Mori

Michael is the Director of the financial services practice at Dalberg Design, based in New York. He supports businesses, governments, and non-profits to reach underserved markets through human-centered product and service design, as well as evidence-based policy reform, leveraging a range of qualitative and quantitative research and analysis methodologies.

The Missing Middles: Segmenting Enterprises to Better Understand Their Financial Needs

Small and growing businesses (SGBs) contribute to significant positive impact in emerging economies, but they struggle to access the capital they need to reach their full potential. According to the IFC, SGBs in emerging markets face a $930 billion financing gap. Many are stuck squarely in the “missing middle”: they are too big for microfinance, too small or risky for traditional bank lending, and lack the growth, return, and exit potential sought by venture capitalists. 

Priti Rao

Priti Rao is the Asia Director for Dalberg Design. Her expertise lies in helping organisations become purpose-led, and build a culture of innovation to solve complex global challenges. She works closely with teams and clients to combine data with field insights and bring a human-centred focus to civic design, financial inclusion, technology, and policy challenges.
 

Trevor Zimmer

Trevor Zimmer is a Director at Dalberg Design where he leads project engagements with public and private sector clients to apply design as a facilitative process and skillset. He believes design better enables teams and organizations to collaborate across disciplines, align interests, contribute to organizational learnings, and identify solutions. His focus is on global health, change management, and new ventures.
 

"Where are the Men?" Emerging Design Insights and Opportunities for Reaching Young Men in The Battle Against HIV

The burden of HIV/AIDS on women and girls in sub-Saharan Africa is well known.

Privacy in Financial Services

Dalberg recently hosted a workshop on ‘Privacy in Financial Services’ in collaboration with CGAP and Dvara Research. We brought together an eclectic group of fintechs, catalytic funders, banks, policy makers, investors and foundations who collectively brainstormed ideas for how we might better protect consumer data and privacy. The Dalberg Mumbai team put together an interactive exhibit to give participants a taste of how we might better design consent and other privacy related matters.

Meet Your New R&D Team: Social Entrepreneurs

Corporate Social Responsibility is generally viewed as a way to “give back” to communities that a business operates in. What happens when you reverse that model and place these investments at the front-end of your corporate innovation strategy? In this post on The Harvard Business Review, Robert Fabricant discusses an approach to social innovation that can drive both new opportunities and new behavior within your organization while achieving social impact?

Read the article.

The Rapidly Disappearing Business of Design

In this opinion piece on Wired, Robert Fabricant offers his reflections on the rapid consolidation of the design business in 2014 and makes the case for a healthy, independent design practice to tackle broader social issues that do not fit within a single corporate mandate.

Read the article.